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#1 MikeRL411

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 01:26 PM

Those of us who use or want to use Rotella should go to www.rotella.com/rebate .



#2 hang_510

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 08:19 AM

Gone.
Switched to Delo as it is $1 less

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#3 datzenmike

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:13 AM

This only applies to the T5 and T6 heavy duty oils.

 

 

I think the 'old' Rotella T oil I used to buy is now labeled Rotella T4. This is the 15w40 I prefer.

 

T5* is a synthetic 'blend' one (of two) marked FA4 which is a new category of low viscosity fuel saving oils. I don't know how well they work on or protect older engines. The other is just a synthetic 'blend'.

 

T6* is full synthetic (5W30) and comes in two forms. With one an extreme temperature oil.(5W40)

 

*I'm not a fan of synthetic oils myself. If I had a newer turbo engine maybe. If you look after your stock engine and change the oil and filter you don't really need this over protection.


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#4 thisismatt

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:17 AM

Conventional oil viscosity changes drastically with breakdown, whereas synthetic holds up much better and viscosity remains more consistent. Especially in cold climates this is important
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#5 datzenmike

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 10:11 AM

Yes it does have advantages if the conditions warrant the extreme expense. If regular dinosaur oil is changed at the recommended times this isn't a problem. I ran the 15w40 last winter (first winter driving in my 710 ever) and noticed no difference cranking and starting, or driving that the old 10W30 from decades ago. But it only got to about 20F. I primarily drive for a few months around the Canby trip. It does see over 100F in eastern Washington. For the mileage we're talking I can change it every 2 years. About every 3-4K miles which is about half the recommended amount. Next spring it's due. It's never black, barely dark brown because of long trips. 

 

Tried synthetic only once on my 620. It began leaking out of the engine it was so thin/slippery. The cost was prohibitive for no tangible advantages. It's not overly hot or cold here at barely 20F to 95F.


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#6 Bory

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 10:40 AM

The nice thing about the rotella is that it has a zinc additive, so it's great for break in oil, especially if you have cast iron dissy gear and cast iron cam, like in ford HO motor, as I had in the Datstang.

#7 datzenmike

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 10:59 AM

The high ZDDP levels are great all the time.

 

IMG_3958.JPG

 

I should imagine wear like this is most likely from the newer formula oils with little to no ZDDP in them. Imagine what the cam lobe looks like!!! This engine (L series) was developed in the mid '60s for the oil of it's day. Oil makers have moved on and don't give a shit about you. Don't believe what they may say about ZDDP levels being backwards compatible... they don't drive Datsuns. Research what ZDDP does and how critical it is for tappet cams and make an informed decision about the oil you use. 


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#8 thisismatt

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 11:04 AM

Yes it does have advantages if the conditions warrant the extreme expense. If regular dinosaur oil is changed at the recommended times this isn't a problem. I ran the 15w40 last winter (first winter driving in my 710 ever) and noticed no difference cranking and starting, or driving that the old 10W30 from decades ago. But it only got to about 20F. I primarily drive for a few months around the Canby trip. It does see over 100F in eastern Washington. For the mileage we're talking I can change it every 2 years. About every 3-4K miles which is about half the recommended amount. Next spring it's due. It's never black, barely dark brown because of long trips. 

 

Tried synthetic only once on my 620. It began leaking out of the engine it was so thin/slippery. The cost was prohibitive for no tangible advantages. It's not overly hot or cold here at barely 20F to 95F.

 

syn is like $10 more per change...like $600 over the life of your engine


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#9 datzenmike

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 11:07 AM

Just doesn't work for me.


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#10 505plus5

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 02:45 PM

Recommended oil for a '79 L20B with 60K original miles, in the So. Cal. Low Desert area, anyone????? :)  :)

 

You know what? Make that a

 

72 L16 90K 

78 L24 100K

79 L20B 60K

.

.

.

any1?  :)



#11 datzenmike

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 04:34 PM

Did you read this thread?

 

When they came out 10W30 would have done for your new Datsuns, but engines are made differently these days. None are made without roller cams, so to reduce tail pipe emissions of zinc, the zinc anti scuff additive ZDDP has and still is, slowly being  fazed out. The level in today's oil is (well I think) dangerously low for tappet cams. 

 

I don't know if full synthetic oil is able to prevent scuffing over the long run (maybe) and I doubt it contains any ZDDP so??? roll the dice. Some racing oils still have high levels and diesel oils maintain the same high(er) levels as before. Type ZDDP into google and start reading.


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#12 505plus5

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 06:01 PM

I read from the top, DM. But, as mentioned, the oils' qualities are changing. By that, I suppose 10W30 back then, isn't the same quality 10W30 now.

#13 datzenmike

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 06:34 PM

Correct. The oil may be better but the anti scuff additive ZDDP is much less because it's not needed in new engines.


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#14 DanielC

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 07:09 PM

Very simply, old engines need old (formula) oils.  

I use Valvoline VR-1 racing oil.   Last time I got some, I just used Amazon to get it.



#15 MikeRL411

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 08:19 PM

This only applies to the T5 and T6 heavy duty oils.

 

 

I think the 'old' Rotella T oil I used to buy is now labeled Rotella T4. This is the 15w40 I prefer.

 

T5* is a synthetic 'blend' one (of two) marked FA4 which is a new category of low viscosity fuel saving oils. I don't know how well they work on or protect older engines. The other is just a synthetic 'blend'.

 

T6* is full synthetic (5W30) and comes in two forms. With one an extreme temperature oil.(5W40)

 

*I'm not a fan of synthetic oils myself. If I had a newer turbo engine maybe. If you look after your stock engine and change the oil and filter you don't really need this over protection.

 

"Synthetic" really means that it is formulated [by unknown and proprietary means] from natural gas!  Lord knows how much Hydro Flouric acid is used to make this "improved" fluid!  Reference the recent Torrance CA refinery disasters!



#16 Ranman72

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 10:16 PM

Recommended oil for a '79 L20B with 60K original miles, in the So. Cal. Low Desert area, anyone????? :)  :)

 

You know what? Make that a

 

72 L16 90K 

78 L24 100K

79 L20B 60K

.

.

.

any1?  :)

i use Valvoline vr1 race oil still has a high content of zinc 

i am told the 15/40  diesel oils also run high zinc content 

i used to run castrol but most oils including castrol have such reduced amount of zinc it will ruin your rockers and other parts as well 



#17 505plus5

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 04:54 PM

Hmmm... good topic. Important, I'd say. Very!

#18 datzenmike

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 06:51 PM

I think Castrol has a 'racing' oil also.


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#19 hang_510

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 09:39 PM

i am told the 15/40  diesel oils also run high zinc content 

Been using them since break in. Last valve adjustment everything still looks new.

"I can spend time working on the Dattos, or wasting money at the strip club. You make the call." :D


I'll put on chain mail and a dirt bike tire jock strap and drive it!!!!!


#20 Crashtd420

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 02:09 AM

Has anyone used the royal purple?
I currently have there break in fluid in my engine....
Screenshot_20170914-060114.png

I plan to follow it up with the hp oil.. there regular synthetic is not the same as this.....

Screenshot_20170914-060041.png

Both the break in and hp oil have high zinc and phosphorus, and claim to be excellent for flat tappet cams...