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Coilovers on a 411?


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#1 Sapoo

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Posted 12 February 2017 - 10:10 AM

Has anyone put coilovers in a 411? Is it even possible?

#2 datzenmike

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Posted 12 February 2017 - 10:31 AM

Are not the 411s coil spring with a shock absorber in the middle? Check out ]2eDeYe's 411. He's lowering the ride height by trimming the coils.

 

...  http://community.rat...-canby-or-bust/ ... page 10?

 

What would be the point of an adjustable coil over set up unless you plan to adjust the ride height every week? 99.99% of coil overs get set and left and the rest of the time they are just along for the ride.


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#3 reza

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 11:07 AM

Are not the 411s coil spring with a shock absorber in the middle? Check out ]2eDeYe's 411. He's lowering the ride height by trimming the coils.

 

...  http://community.rat...-canby-or-bust/ ... page 10?

 

What would be the point of an adjustable coil over set up unless you plan to adjust the ride height every week? 99.99% of coil overs get set and left and the rest of the time they are just along for the ride.

 When you trim old coils or any coil, you make a cut and hope for the best, it's all blind guess work. The point of Adjustable coilovers is setting your ride height exactly where you want it, drive around see how it handles, make adjustments and tune to perfection. 


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#4 datzenmike

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 11:34 AM

NEVER should you cut a coil to set ride height. It randomly increases the spring rate.

NEVER should you heat a spring to make it sag to set the ride height.

 

 

What you say is not true.

 

If you can multiply and divide you can easily work out your current spring rate and how much to trim off to get the rate you want. I worked out my 710 spring rate to 100 lb./in. (which agrees with the FSM) and with a little math, trimmed them to make 50% higher rate. Anyone can do this. The hardest part is the careful measurements.

 

The formula is simple

11,250,000 X wire diameter4/ 8 X number of free coils X coil diameter3

 

All measurements in inches.

Free coils are coils not touching other coils

Wire diameter is one thickness of the coil material

Coil diameter is outside diameter minus one wire thickness OR inside diameter and add one wire thickness. Basically the center to center across the diameter of the coil.

 

Ride height can be made adjustable for under $25. Coil overs are the biggest waste of money there is.  


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#5 reza

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 12:09 PM


 "Coil overs are the biggest waste of money there is."

With that reasoning you might as well stop wrenching on your 410 or 411, kind of like throwing money into a pit anyhow. You kind of lost me on your post format. 


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#6 G-Duax

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 01:22 PM

I run coil-overs so I can play with different spring rates on my Toyota, but it's going to be run on tracks, not just bopping around the street.

Years ago, before I was serious about being a ricky-racer, I cut & heated many coil springs, and never ruined a set.

Just took measurements, and figured out how much to cut.

 

But Mike, you are assuming young people know anything about math, or how to properly heat a spring, then re-temper it.

Let alone know how to choose spring & dampening rates.

 

Even though, you can buy coil-overs out of ching-chong land these days for next to nothing, I'm with Mike.

Don't waste your money if you are not a serious road racer.


"All of a sudden it started making noise, then started losing power. I limped the car home and tried to get it up the driveway, the engine just died."

 

Why do people do this?

A $100 tow bill is never as much as the extra damage you cause by trying to "limp the car home".

 

Don't be that person !


#7 reza

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 01:40 PM

I run coil-overs so I can play with different spring rates on my Toyota, but it's going to be run on tracks, not just bopping around the street.

Years ago, before I was serious about being a ricky-racer, I cut & heated many coil springs, and never ruined a set.

Just took measurements, and figured out how much to cut.

 

But Mike, you are assuming young people know anything about math, or how to properly heat a spring, then re-temper it.

Let alone know how to choose spring & dampening rates.

 

Even though, you can buy coil-overs out of ching-chong land these days for next to nothing, I'm with Mike.

Don't waste your money if you are not a serious road racer.


Yeah, for the record, I didn't say cutting or heating springs was bad. I did imply that Coilovers are easier and less time consuming than fucking around with 50 year old tired springs. 


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