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Jake's 320 Build


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#41 emceefarlane

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Posted 21 June 2015 - 03:45 AM

connor - looks like your E pump is new enough so you have both options. either swap the top section of your L pump onto your E or swap the arms over

 

my E and L are different

 

67m7v9.jpg

 

L on left E on right

 

w2mubk.jpg

 

difrangia - i've read in another thread that the E and J pumps are the same for 320 520 and 521's. and as Connor has said the L pump does mount to the E block. i have a pump with a primer lever and one without and both came off of E's.

 

as for the hybrid lever - fabrication is not my strong point. the L arm is solid and the E arm is made from three separate pieces connected with the rivets/studs.

 

the L pump has a slightly lower pivot point than the E as well

 

34zg8rd.jpg

 

the one-way valves and their gaskets are exactly the same in the L and E and can be interchanged.



#42 finney

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Posted 21 June 2015 - 04:27 AM

http://www.ebay.com....=item3f4efe447c



#43 difrangia

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Posted 21 June 2015 - 04:29 AM

Almost enough Jamesons. Forgot to hook the pics on.

 

e90de170-9678-489b-a2d2-939fddcc284b_zps

 

66b8f9ed-a566-4673-93c0-b8d110283f33_zps

 

ac6af865-f44e-435e-8470-185b07c938ad_zps

 

Little bitty feller compared to the J and L pumps.

 

Steve



#44 difrangia

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Posted 21 June 2015 - 04:36 AM

I;m wondering if the diaphram from the L pump can be trimmed down an if there's enough area to punch the five holes to use on the five-screw E1 pump? If that will fly, the central rod may require modification also. This fuel pump fix thing has been on my mind for a while. I'm not particularly fond of electric pumps.

 

Steve



#45 Conner

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Posted 21 June 2015 - 05:34 AM

Thanks for posting pics of the original 5-screw/tinman-style E-1 fuel pump with the primer.  I've only seen a couple of pics of that one before and not with that kind of detail.  



#46 emceefarlane

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Posted 21 June 2015 - 07:51 PM

 

have you bought or used one similar to this? the arm looks completely different - it could still work and just connect with a different part of the cam. would probably want to test on a pulled down engine though first rather than suck it and see and do some damage



#47 emceefarlane

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 02:08 AM

i've given up

 

5foi0m.jpg



#48 Stoffregen Motorsports

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Posted 09 July 2015 - 08:04 AM

Considering that motor is a licensed copy of a BMC/Leyland motor, I did a search for BMC mechanical fuel pump, and I got a few promising results. Looks like a Mini pump would work.

 

http://www.classicmi...998-non-genuine

 

https://www.google.c...ff5IoPNq_r45iM:

 

I wouldn't go and tamper with the lever. They are heat treated. If you made one and the heat treating wasn't spot on, it could wear out the drive lobe on the cam.



#49 Stoffregen Motorsports

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Posted 09 July 2015 - 08:05 AM

Even a BMC diesel lift pump looks like it would work.

 

http://www.asap-supp...bmc-1800-131040



#50 emceefarlane

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 01:07 AM

Considering that motor is a licensed copy of a BMC/Leyland motor, I did a search for BMC mechanical fuel pump, and I got a few promising results. Looks like a Mini pump would work.

 

http://www.classicmi...998-non-genuine

 

https://www.google.c...ff5IoPNq_r45iM:

 

I wouldn't go and tamper with the lever. They are heat treated. If you made one and the heat treating wasn't spot on, it could wear out the drive lobe on the cam.

 

The first thing i tried was the MG specialists in adelaide - they said they all came with electric fuel pumps from factory so i assumed it was a dead end

 

Even a BMC diesel lift pump looks like it would work.

 

http://www.asap-supp...bmc-1800-131040

 

This does look like it would work, not sure if there would be a difference between diesel/petrol

 

I would try that out if i wasn't already $80 invested in fuel pumps/switches etc and hadn't asked a machine shop to manufacture a plate to put in place of the diaphragm in the mechanical pump so i can leave it bolted there



#51 Stoffregen Motorsports

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 07:20 AM

Bummer. I would like to have found out if it worked or not.

 

I like the idea of leaving the pump body for aesthetics.



#52 emceefarlane

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 04:34 PM

*edit - after connecting this all up today it seems as though the pump doesn't want to lift from the tank mounted here - even though it's within the parameters specified for the pump. i'm going to try and relocate underneath the tank and see how that goes

 

this is how i've mounted the electric pump. i'm going to wire it through a relay and a kill switch with the pos from the ignition. not through an oil pressure switch like i know i'm supposed to

 

2me8ylt.jpg

 

the plate to separate the top and bottom half of the mechanical pump

 

jjn3hz.jpg

 

the pump put together with the plate and a gasket. removed the arm because it's not doing anything and put the pin back in so no water/dirt gets in the crankcase

 

21lqzo2.jpg



#53 Stoffregen Motorsports

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Posted 19 July 2015 - 09:52 PM

Yeah, those pumps don't like to be above the tank. You need a bit of gravity to make them work well and last long. A lot of people install them incorrectly and  lot of people have problems because of that.

 

When I use a Facet pump, I try to get it as close to the tank as possible and mounted underneath the lowest point of the tank.



#54 emceefarlane

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 08:30 PM

*edit - the pump works well in this location now, just took a lot more priming than expected and i think there may have been a small air leak that was hindering the operation

 

*edit - after connecting this all up today it seems as though the pump doesn't want to lift from the tank mounted here - even though it's within the parameters specified for the pump. i'm going to try and relocate underneath the tank and see how that goes

 

this is how i've mounted the electric pump. i'm going to wire it through a relay and a kill switch with the pos from the ignition. not through an oil pressure switch like i know i'm supposed to

 

2me8ylt.jpg

 

 

 

Okay so now i've sorted the electric pump out - with the added pressure (pump is now pushing - not sucking) the original glass bowl fuel filter and the gasket i used in the dummy mounted mechanical pump are leaking. I've bypassed both of them for now so i could take it for a drive. Worked out that the float valve in the carburetor doesn't work because if you leave it idling for too long the sight glass fills up and the car starts to run and sound like it has a heavy cam in it.

 

Brakes need another bleed again i think as it still feels a bit squishy. Other than that it drives pretty well

 

Looking forward to getting it back on the road coming into spring



#55 Stoffregen Motorsports

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Posted 12 August 2015 - 08:53 PM

Not much is more exciting then the first drive after a long time sitting. Teardown is a bit more exciting, but barely.



#56 emceefarlane

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 09:31 PM

okay so brake bleeding - bad times

 

i couldn't get the pedal firm no matter how much bleeding i did. went through and tried to tighten everything to make sure it was all sweet. found the brake pressure switch was leaking out the top of the bakelite bit.

 

bought a new brake pressure switch for $26. fuelmiser

 

ivl1c5.jpg

 

looks exactly like this 

 

169hnvt.jpg

 

okay so with the old switch the entire thread went into the manifold that it screws into, the new switch got tight with around half of the thread still exposed - is that an issue? also how to you bleed the switch because it's at the very top point of the brake system and i don't think normal bleeding of the slave cylinders or even the manifold block will displace the air in it? am i just being paranoid?



#57 Stoffregen Motorsports

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Posted 04 September 2015 - 07:55 PM

It may be the difference between BSPT and NPT. I didn't think 320's had BSPT on them anywherre so maybe it's just a bit larger. You could always run a tap into the tee where the switch goes. Just a couple turns. If it's in more than 3 threads, I wouldn't worry about it.

 

As far as bleeding, you could crack the line at the master and do the normal bleeding procedure there. Bleeding at the wheels will work, but it may take a few days for the air bubbles to work their way around. When I bleed a system for the first time, I don't expect to get all the air. I usually let it sit for a couple days and then bleed again.



#58 difrangia

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Posted 05 September 2015 - 05:30 AM

It may be the difference between BSPT and NPT. I didn't think 320's had BSPT on them anywherre so maybe it's just a bit larger. You could always run a tap into the tee where the switch goes. Just a couple turns. If it's in more than 3 threads, I wouldn't worry about it.

 

As far as bleeding, you could crack the line at the master and do the normal bleeding procedure there. Bleeding at the wheels will work, but it may take a few days for the air bubbles to work their way around. When I bleed a system for the first time, I don't expect to get all the air. I usually let it sit for a couple days and then bleed again.

 

Good information here. I ran into this issue on installing a pressure gage on the oil sender port when rebuilding the E1 engine. I can't remember which exactly is larger but BSPT is a straight thread (British Straight Pipe Thread; S=straight) and NPT is a taper thread (National Pipe Taper; T=taper) and there is about .020 or .5mm difference in diameter at the start of thread and one is 27 and the other is 28 threads per inch in pitch. Some important stuff to keep in mind when dealing with the senders and fuel pump fittings. Steve



#59 Stoffregen Motorsports

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Posted 05 September 2015 - 08:48 AM

Good information here. I ran into this issue on installing a pressure gage on the oil sender port when rebuilding the E1 engine. I can't remember which exactly is larger but BSPT is a straight thread (British Straight Pipe Thread; S=straight) and NPT is a taper thread (National Pipe Taper; T=taper) and there is about .020 or .5mm difference in diameter at the start of thread and one is 27 and the other is 28 threads per inch in pitch. Some important stuff to keep in mind when dealing with the senders and fuel pump fittings. Steve

Actually BSP is straight and BSPT is tapered. The T=taper.

 

NPT is not larger by design, but it seems most NPT fittings do have a larger diameter. Probably just a difference in manufaturing design. It would be like the "as built" phrase in building permits. The design was as such, but it changed so...as built.



#60 emceefarlane

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 07:57 PM

Replaced all the copper washers and bleeder nipples. Bled through a clear brake fluid so i could be sure it was reaching the all of the slave cylinders, then bled through the blue coloured brake fluid again. Still no good