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My Dragon Datsun 521


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#141 DanielC

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 04:43 PM

More door work, done last week.
DoorPanel.JPG
I removed the window crank, and the inside open handle.
CranksOff.JPG
Then used this tool.
DoorPanelTool1.JPG
To remove the door panel.

DoorPanelTool2.JPG

DoorPanelTool3.JPG

DoorPanelTool4.JPG

This is the back of the door panel.
DoorPanelBack.JPG
 
One of the clips pulled off the door panel. 
DoorPanelClip.JPG
That panel clip broke.
DoorPanelClipBad.JPG

This door has been apart before, and did not have the openings in the door covered with plastic.  The service manual from Nissan says to remove the plastic sheet carefully.  I am guessing plastic sheet was harder to come by in Japan, in 1970 than it is now, in 2017.
 
This is the door lock cylinder, it is the next thing to come out of the door.
DoorLockCylinder.JPG
The small clip on the door lock cylinder back is very easy to lose.  there is usually dirt, crud, and and window run channel in the bottom of the door for this clip to get lost in.
 
I place my finger over the closed end of the clip, and then work the end of the small screwdriver under the clip, wiggling the clip slowly off the back of the door lock.
CylinderClipRemoval.JPG

I then take the lever off the lock cylinder,
CylinderLever.JPG

Then I put the clip back on the cylinder. Did I mention the clip is really easy to lose?
CylinderClipOn.JPG

Then I used a pair of Vice Grips to remove the door lock cylinder retainer, it just slides off.
CylinderRetainer.JPG

Then the door lock cylinder easily comes out of the door.
CylinderOut.JPG


Next, I remove these screws around the door catch on the back of the door,
DoorLockAssyScrew.JPG
 
these screws near the bottom of the back of the door.  If you have an older 521, that does not have the inside door lock knob near the back of the door, these screws are not there.
BellCrankScrew.JPG
 
Remove the two screws holding the door inside control to the door.
DoorLockInsideControl.JPG
 
and unscrew the door lock knob, if you have one.
DoorLockKnob.JPG
 
With all the screws out of the parts of the door lock mechanism, you can fold the rods close to each other, and take the whole mechanism out of the door.
DoorLockMechanism1.JPG
 
DoorLockMechanism2.JPG

#142 DanielC

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 03:07 PM

After removing the door lock mechanism, the windows can be removed from the door.
Remove the sliding window lower stop, by removing these two screws.
WindowStopScrews.JPG

Roll the window about half way up.
WindowHalfUp.JPG

Remove the four window regulator screws.
WindowRegulatorScrews.JPG
 
While holding the window, push the window regulator inside the door, and slide the roller on the regulator arm off the sliding window roller track.
RegulatorRemove1.JPG
You can loop a string around the sliding window roller track, to hold the window.  This picture was hard to get with only two hands.

Remove the screws that hold the front window run channel, on the vent window to the door.  The window regulator arm is in a narrow slot between the inside of the door, and the vent window channel. 
VentRunScrew1.JPG
 
Removing the two screws lets the regulator arm drop out between the door and vent channel.
RegulatorRemove2.JPG
 
The regulator can then be removed from the door.
RegulatorRemove3.JPG


WindowOnString1.JPG

WindowOnString2.JPG
After the sliding window regulator is out, the sliding window needs to go to the bottom of the door.  This is why you need the string.

Remove the four vent window screws on the front of the door frame.
VentScrew1.JPG
 
This screw was already missing.
VentScrew2.JPG
The three bottom screws are sheet metal tapping screws.  The top screw is a machine screw.
VentScrew3.JPG

VentScrew4.JPG
 
This screw was stuck, and the head would not grip the Phillips head screwdriver.  This picture was taken after the head stripped, and was hammered back to try to get the screwdriver to hold.  It did not.
VentScrew5.JPG
 
I used a 1/32 cutoff disk to cut a slot in the top of the screw head.
VentScrew7.JPG

VentScrew6.JPG
Then a slotted screwdriver was used to remove the screw.
VentScrew8.JPG

#143 DanielC

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 03:07 PM


Use a slotted screwdriver to gently pry the window seal up out of the clips holding it.
WindowSeal1.JPG

This is one of eight seal clips. Part of the top of it is missing.
WindowSealClip1.JPG
Use a thin screwdriver to gently pry it away from the door.
WindowSealClip2.JPG

Grab it with a pair of pliers to pull it away from the door, and then lift it out of the slot in the door.
WindowSealClip3.JPG

Open the vent window.
VentRemoval1.JPG
Grab it with your hand,
VentRemoval2.JPG
Pull the top of the vent window frame toward the rear of the door.
VentRemoval3.JPG
Swing the top of the vent window outside of the door frame when it is clear of the door frame,
VentRemoval4.JPG
and then the vent window can be slid out of the door.

The sliding window is still in the door, my finger is on the top edge of the glass. Use the string, or just grab it and raise it up
WindowRemoval1.JPG

Hold a corner of the glass, once it is out of the window slot.
WindowRemoval2.JPG

Rotate the window so the bottom of the window is toward the front,
WindowRemoval3.JPG

And the window can be removed from the door.
WindowRemoval4.JPG

And this is why I took the door apart. A lot of the old run channel felt was in the bottom of the door. this is the rear channle, inside the door.
RunChannelOld1.JPG

This is the rear run channel at the top of the door.
RunChannelOld2.JPG

#144 DanielC

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 01:47 PM

I have found this window run channel from Mygrant Glass company works for the sliding window on a 521.  It is available from Mygrant Glass.  Unfortunately, they do not sell retail, you need to find a auto glass person, or company and have them order it for you.
WindowChannel.JPG
 
This is the adhesive I use to glue the run channel, and other weather strip on cars.
WeatherstripAdhesive.JPG
 
I then cleaned the door lock mechanism, and noticed a spring was missing on it.  The old grease was hard, and gumming up functioning of the mechanism. 
LockMechanism.JPG
 
Part cleaned, and spring replaced.
LockMechanism2.JPG
 
This is part that holds the inside door release handle.  It got cleaned too, hard to tell.
RemoteControl.JPG
 
Part cleaned, and greased.
RemoteControl2.JPG
 
This is the part that is needed if your 521 doors have an inside lock button, that pulls up and down to lock the door from the inside.  It also lets the lock knob that is inside the sliding window in the door work the lock mechanism that is outside the sliding window in the door.
BellCrank.JPG
 
I also wirebrushed some rust off it, cleaned old hard grease off it, and worked some new grease into it.
BellCrank2.JPG
 
I did a trial assembly of parts in the door, but did not take many pictures of that, I am trying to get a good order of pictures to put in this thread.  This is the lock mechanism,
LockMechInDoor.JPG
 
The remote in the door,
RemoteInDoor.JPG
 
and the bell crank in the bottom of the rear of the door.  This is wrong the two rods going down cross over each other.  I had to pull the assembly back out of the door, turn the bell crank over and make the rods not cross each other. 
BellRodsWrong.JPG
 
This is the fourth 521 door I put new sliding window run channel in.  On the third door I did, the sliding window was really hard to move.  

 

This is the rear top of the window run channel in this door.  On the thinner, upper in the picture, flange, the metal folded over is not crimped completely down, inside the channel.  I used a piece of steel on the outside of the door, to protect the metal, and with a pair vice grips squeezed the metal down some more.  Pictures of that later.
RunChannelOld2.JPG



#145 DanielC

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Posted 25 December 2017 - 03:06 PM

I am going to park this here for now.

521wires.jpg



#146 mainer311

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Posted 25 December 2017 - 03:36 PM

You can google “Datsun 521 wiring schematic” and there’s a direct link to a more readable PDF document. I printed one on 11x17 and I keep it folded up in the glove box.

#147 Draker

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Posted 25 December 2017 - 08:07 PM

Great detail and pictures!

View my 69 510 4dr Sedan - Build Thread
View my 71 510 2dr Sedan - Coming soon.

http://drakers.pl510.info

 

 


#148 DanielC

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 12:02 AM

It was a day after Christmas miracle!
Oregon is going to raise the rates for car registration January 1, 2018.  I decided to do the insurance and registration on Dragon before year end, before the rates go up, and as a little extra motivation to get Dragon on the road again.

I was in and out of the Oregon DMV office in 12 minutes.



#149 Crashtd420

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 04:51 AM

That's gotta feel good having it registered.... and thanks for all these pics... I'll be using them just incase to put my doors back together....

#150 DanielC

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 05:56 AM

Door reassembly. Pictures now, some text added.
After cleaning the windows, lock mechanism, and doing any repair you need on the doors, you can reassemble them.  I can pretty much guarantee you need new window run channel, see post 133, above.
Cut a piece of the run channel that is a little longer than the vent window, glue it in to the wing window track.
RunChannelFit1.JPG
Put the remaining run channel on the top of the window, a little past the front corner of the window.  Make two 45 degree cuts in both edges of the run channel, four cuts total like this.
ChannelCornerCut.JPG
The 45 degree cuts allow the run channel to fit in the upper rear corner of the door window frame.
RunChannelCorner.JPG
Apply weather strip glue to the run channel.
ChannelGlue1.JPG
Put the run channle, with glue into the track the window goes in on the door frame.
ChannelGlue2.JPG
I used this piece of wood, cut from a wood shim to make sure the run channel was in the bottom of the track.
ChannelGlue3.JPG
Like this.
ChannelGlue4.JPG
After the run channel is glued into the door frame, you put the sliding window in the door.  The slot in the door is slightly wider where the vent window frame fits, slide the bottom of the glass through that slot.
WindowIn1.JPG
Then rotate the window so the bottom of the window is down.
WindowIn2.JPG
Loop a heavy string around the roller track on the bottom of the window.  this makes it easier to pull the glass up from the bottom of the door.
WindowString1.JPG
Let the window go all the way to the bottom of the door, and then put the back edge of the glass in the rear run channel, back of the door.
WindowString2.JPG
Make sure the back edge of the glass is in the run channel.
WindowIn3.JPG
With the glass in the run channel in the back, start the vent window and frame in to the door.
VentIn1.JPG
Get the front edge of the sliding glass top corner started into the vent window run channel.
WindowIn4.JPG
Check again to make sure the back edge, and the front top corner of the sliding glass are both in the run channel, and carefully slide the vent window down into the door, and forward to where it is seated into the door frame.  Do not put any screws in to the vent window frame.
VentIn2.JPG
Pull the sliding window up with the string, and tie the string to the top of the door frame.  Pull it as high as you can, higher than in this photo
VentIn3.JPG
Put a crank on the window regulator, and make the regulator mount, and arm approximately straight, then put it in the door, using the back hole in the door.  Reach inside the door and pull the bottom of the vent window frame out, away from the cab, and then slip the regulator arm between the inside panel of the door, and the vent window frame.
RegIn1.JPG
Lower the sliding window enough to see the roller track.  Put the roller on the end of the in the roller track.
RegIn2.JPG
This looks like the picture above, but this is with the regulator roller in the track on the sliding window.
RegIn3.JPG
Lift the window regulator, and put the crank pivot through its hole in the door.  Then put the crank back on the pivot, and turn the window crank until the four mounting holes line up with the holes in the door.
RegIn4.JPG
Put the regulator screws in the door, loosely, then snug them, and finally tighten them. 
RegIn5.JPG
Notice the vent frame screws are still not in, but now you can start them.
RegIn6.JPG

 

This post was close to its picture limit, so it ends here.



#151 Charlie69

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 10:10 AM

It was a day after Christmas miracle!
Oregon is going to raise the rates for car registration January 1, 2018.  I decided to do the insurance and registration on Dragon before year end, before the rates go up, and as a little extra motivation to get Dragon on the road again.

I was in and out of the Oregon DMV office in 12 minutes.

 I have kept my 66 registered since I purchased it about ten years ago. $19 and change every year is worth not having to go to the MVD to get it registered to drive it.  All I have to do to drive it is to get online and record my insurance information with MVD and drive.



#152 DanielC

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 11:06 PM

Door assembly, continued.

Start the two inside vent frame screws.  Do not tighten them yet. 
VentScrewR1.JPG

 

You need to put these four screws into the vent window first.  The bottom screws are a #8 sheet metal, or tap screw.  The top screw is a #8-32 machine screw.  These four screws are about a 1/4 long. 
VentScrewR2.JPG

 

I got some stainless steel screws to replace the rusty screws that were originally in the door.  Put these screws in, and tighten them.  If you turn a sheet metal screw backwards, it will find then old threads, and when you feel it drop in to the old you tighten it, and not cut new threads, and weaken the threads as much. 
VentFourScrews.JPG

Now you can tighten the screws in the bottom of the vent window frame.
VentScrewR3.JPG

Check to see if the window rolls up and down, and then roll it up to the top.

 

Now you can reinstall the lock mechanism.  The inside door open handle holder sits in this position inside the door.  Notice it is above the rod that goes back to the lock mechanism.  It can pivot below the rod, but you cannot get the screws in it, if it does pivot.
LockRemote1.JPG

 

Slide the forward door control in the back hole of the door, and then the lock mechanism.  This is an older 521 door, without the inside lock knob.  Later lock mechanisms have an inside lock knob, and have two extra rods that go toward the bottom of the door, near the back of the door.   These extra rods can be folded close to the forward door control, and the whole assembly can be slid in the door.  Make sure the two rods that go to the bottom of the door do not cross each other.
LockMech1.JPG

Just another picture of sliding the lock mechanism in the door.
LockMech2.JPG
Another picture of sliding the lock mechanism in the door.
LockMech3.JPG

 

Put the lock mechanism into its hole in the back of the door.
LockMech4.JPG

 

This is the outside of the back of the door, lock mechanism sitting in the door.
LockMech5.JPG

 

Start the three screws into the lock mechanism, do not tighten yet.
LockMech6.JPG

Lift the forward remote control into position, remember it has to to be above the rod that goes back to the lock mechanism.
LockRemote2.JPG

 

Put the screws into it, again loosely.
LockRemote3.JPG

You can now tighten the three lock mechanism screws in the back outside of the door, then tighten the two screws that hold the remote control to the door, near the front of the door.

 

This is the lock cylinder hole.  Notice the three notches on the lock cylinder.
CylinderHole.JPG

 

Notice the three tabs on the lock cylinder, they fit the notches in the door.
LockCylinder.JPG

 

Put the lock cylinder in the door.
CylinderInHole.JPG

 

Slide the lock retainer clip on the lock cylinder.  The clip is about half way on in this picture.  I put some grease on the retainer, to make assembly, and disassembly easier. 
CylinderRetainClip1.JPG

 

The cylinder retainer clip is just pushed all the way on the lock cylinder.  Notice a rod hanging down below the lock mechanism.
CylinderRetainClip2.JPG

 

This is the lever on the rod, that goes over the lock cylinder.
CylinderLever1.JPG

 

The lever is just slid over the end of the lock cylinder,
CylinderLever2.JPG

 

And the clip is slid on the end of the lock cylinder, holding the lever.
CylinderLever3.JPG



#153 Stoffregen Motorsports

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 09:55 AM

Great write-up Daniel.



#154 DanielC

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 02:19 PM

Dragon has had a hard life. It has been in two front end collisions, and was parked next to a rental truck, that turned coming out of a parking spot, and the rear of the rental truck raked the right door, and right front fender.  This picture shows the gap between the radiator support, and the headlight surface on the left front fender.  The right was worse, it had an even bigger gap.
FenderGapLf.JPG

 

In May of 2013, I made these plates out of 1/2 inch steel.  They were cut with an Oxy-acetelene cutting torch, then crudely finished with an angle grinder.  They go inside the headlight bucket.
InnerPlates.JPG

This plate goes on the outside flat surface of the radiator core support, over the headlight bucket. You need to remove the lower grill opening rail to put this plate on the truck, but if you are pulling on the core support, you need to take the lower grill opening rail off anyway, to straighten or replace it.  Use a spot weld saw to remove the lower grill opening rail.
OuterPlates.JPG

 

Here are the plates in the position for the left headlight bucket.  Turn the plates over, and they fit the right side headlight bucket.
PlatesLeft.JPG

This picture is the bolts to clamp the inner and outer plates together.  Also in the picture are three pulling eyes I made.  Once the plates are in the headlight bucket, and bolted together, you can use the three longer bolts to position the pulling eyes where you want then.
PlateHardware.JPG

I parked Dragon close to a post on a carport, parked my Ford Aerostar behind Dragon and chained them together with the trailer balls.
HitchesChained.JPG
Then I used a cable hoist to pull on the radiator core support.
Pull1.JPG

 

Another picture of pulling the headlight bucket forward.  I did a couple of pulls on each side of Dragon.  After each pull, I would take Dragon back into the garage, unbolt 16 bolts, and try the fit of the fender on the truck.  I think I did at least two pulls on each side of the truck.
Pull2.JPG

 

The center of the radiator support was also pushed in.  I made these two brackets that attach to the center of the radiator support using the radiator bolt holes in the core support.  This was an easy pull to do, I just pulled until the part of the hood catch on the hood lined up with the hole for the hood latch on the radiator core support.
RadPull1.JPG

RadPullBracket.JPG

 

The nice thing about working on a pickup is you can store stuff in the bed, but that means when you get the pickup running, you have to find another place to store the stuff that was in the bed.  This picture was taken after the bed of Dragon was mostly cleaned out.  I still had to find a place for this transmission.
BedStuff1.JPG

This stuff was also in the bed of Dragon.
BedStuff2.JPG

 

This is a spot I cleaned out in the bed of another 521 I have.
D2BedStuff.JPG

 

This is where I put the transmission,
D2BedStuff2.JPG

 

Then I put these extra fenders back in the bed of the 521 in the garage.  This 521, I call Dragon Two needs the floor replaced.
D2BedStuff3.JPG

 

The next six pictures are after I took Dragon on a short test drive.
DragonJan14_18Lf.JPG

DragonJan14_18LfRear.JPG

DragonJan14_18Rt.JPG

DragonJan14_18RtFront.JPG

DragonJan14_18Front.JPG

DragonJan14_18Engine.JPG



#155 Stoffregen Motorsports

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 09:08 AM

At first I thought you made those plates as spacers to fill the gap between the fender and radiator support. Nice to see that I was wrong.

 

I've done repairs like that. Sometimes (if the vehicle runs) I'll put it in gear and back it up to give it a hard pull. That can be scary...



#156 DanielC

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 10:40 AM

I contemplated tying it to a tree and backing up method, but that is a little too uncontrolled.  By using the hoist, I can watch, and listen to stuff as is moves.  I can stop the pull if I hear anything ugly, like metal ripping, or spot welds being broken.

 

There are two stages of metal deformation when a stress is applied to the metal.  Elastic deformation, and plastic deformation.  Elastic deformation happens first, and then springs back to the original shape, nothing moves permanently.  Valve springs undergo elastic deformation. 

Plastic deformation happens when all the elastic deformation is "used up".   You are now changing the molecular structure in the metal, and it returns to a new shape when the stress is removed.  The amount of force to move metal once it is in the plastic deformation stage actually drops.  At this point, it becomes very easy to damage things.

 

I am going to park this link here for now.

http://forums.nicocl...in-t375468.html



#157 Charlie69

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 02:41 PM

Daniel I appreciate your multiple pictures and detatailed verbage.  Your attention to detail is second to none!



#158 DanielC

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 11:32 AM

On Wednesday, Jan 14, 2018, I decided to do some preventive maintenance work under Dragon.   I had two of the ramps in the picture, and a friend gave me two more when he moved to a much smaller place.   
OnRamp1.JPG
It is a good thing I like working on Datsuns, a full sized vehicle really does not fit in this garage.
OnRamp2.JPG
 
OnRamp3.JPG
 
Decided to change the oil in the rear axle first.
Diff1.JPG
 
The drain plug has a 1/2 inch square socket.  Being on the bottom of the truck, crud builds up in the plug, preventing the square drive from going all the way into the socket.  I cleaned the crud out with a broken part of an old test light.
Diffplug1.JPG
 
Then I used a 1/2 inch breaker bar to remove the plug.
DiffPlug2.JPG
And let the old oil run into a empty oil bottle, with a funnel.
DiffDrain.JPG
 
The drain plug has a magnet on it, to catch metal bits, and keep them out of the bearings and from getting in between gear teeth.
DiffPlug3.JPG
 
While the rear axle was draining, I cleaned the drain plug.
DiffPlug4.JPG


Next, I drained the transmission.  It has a square drive socket like the transmission.  The oil came out of the transmission much quicker that it did out of the rear axle, rapidly overfilled the funnel, and ran on the floor.
TransDrain1.JPG
 
After cleaning up the mess, I cleaned the transmission drain plug.  I also put a little bit of thread sealant on the threads of the plug.  then I put the drain plug back in.
TransPlug.JPG

The transmission fill plug has a 11/16 square drive, I used a long wrench to remove that plug.
TransFill3.JPG
 
This is a little plunger pump I used to pump the new transmission oil, GL-4, yellow metal safe gear lube into the transmission.  I have this pump from changing the lower unit gear lube in outboard engines for boats.
OilPump1.JPG
 
This is the discharge end of the hose on the oil pump in the fill hole in the transmission.
TransFill2.JPG

 

This is the gear oil I used in the transmission.
TransOil.JPG

 

You pump oil into the transmission until it started to run out of the fill hole.  Remove the fill hose, and put the plug back into the side of the transmission. 

Then I put the drain plug back into the rear axle, and filled the rear axle in the same way as I filled the transmission, and put the rear axle fill plug back in the rear axle, and then time to go to work.



#159 DanielC

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 02:10 PM

Thursday, the next day. I flushed old brake fluid out of the hydraulic clutch master and slave cylinders.  This is a handy tool I use for that.
FluidCup3.JPG
 
I opened the bleed valve on the slave cylinder just a little, and pushed the black rubber boot over the bleed valve.
FluidCup2.JPG
 
And then by pushing the clutch pedal, it pumps fluid into the cup.
FluidCup1.JPG

I pumped the clutch pedal just enough to almost completely drain the clutch master cylinder reservoir. but not enough to pump air into the cylinder.
CMasterDrained.JPG

I used paper towel in the cylinder to clean the inside of the master cylinder,
CMasterClean.JPG

This is the paper towel that was used to wipe out the clutch master cylinder.
CMasterGunk.JPG
When you are pumping fluid through the master cylinder, and slave cylinder, it will save you a lot of time if you do not ever let the master cylinder reservoir get empty.  If it does get empty, you pump air in to the system, and you have to completely pump the air all the way through the system to get the air back out.  This is not so difficult on a clutch system, but on brakes, there is a lot more lines, and slave cylinders for the air to get pumped into.
 
I pumped this much old fluid through the system,
OldFluid.JPG
 
This is some of the the old fluid and trash pumped out of the system.   
Oldfluid2.JPG
 
Then I refilled the clutch master cylinder one last time, and pumped the clutch pedal just enough to bring the fluid level in the master cylinder to the full mark, and put the cap back on.
 
 
Somehow, when I put the five speed transmission in this truck, I did not put the boot that goes over the clutch throw out lever in the transmission before I put the transmission in the truck, this part.
ThrowoutBoot.JPG
 
ThrowoutBoot2.JPG

I cleaned the area on the transmission where it goes, and removed the slave cylinder,
ThrowoutLever.JPG

And then by using a big 18 inch Cresent Wrench, was able to move the throwout lever enough to slip the lever boot into the hole in the bell housing.  No pictures of using the Cresent Wrench to do this, I was more concerned with having to hold the wrench, and not slip.  Then I put the slave cylinder back on the transmission.
ThrowoutLever3.JPG
 
This is the brake fluid I used, the fluid in the green labelled bottles.
BrakeFluid.JPG
 
This is what the fluid looks like in the clutch, and brake master cylinders.
MasterCylinders.JPG