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Replacing Piston Rings......HELP Please.


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#21 Phlebmaster

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 02:04 PM

I did the lower end today....OMG! I started at 6am and was finished at 3:30pm. I was soooo nervous about doing this and it turned out to be a peice of cake. Thanks to everyone who has helped me out with this. She does not smoke anymore and I have tons of power!
:D

Well here are the promised pics, I did not take too many because I was a little more concerned about doing the job right.

Here is the first piston I took out, the rings were in very bad shape and so were the bearings. I replaced rings and bearings.
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Here is the crankshaft, it was in good shape.

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Hahaha....the tool of the devil!

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Here is the first piston I did before honing.

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And this is after I finished all cylinders.

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Now one question.....what is the rules for breaking in the new rings and bearings?? You know, the do's and dont's. Thanks again!
Thanks, Aaron
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#22 Phlebmaster

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 02:20 PM

I forgot to mention....I want this thread to be of help to the next person who is wanting to do this on their own. I would welcome any questions and comments from you guys. :D
Thanks, Aaron
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#23 hang_510

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 02:45 PM

there are many opinions on the 'best' method...

drive it like youll drive it for 1-2 hundred miles. occasional high sped bursts (just to test ;) )
change the oil. (retorque where required)
enjoy. :w00t:

"I can spend time working on the Dattos, or wasting money at the strip club. You make the call." :D


I'll put on chain mail and a dirt bike tire jock strap and drive it!!!!!


#24 Phlebmaster

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 03:01 PM

Thanks Brian!
Thanks, Aaron
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#25 ]2eDeYe

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 03:41 PM

I usually do 500 (nice round number) and change the oil.

Re-torque the head bolts and check the valve clearance.

Enjoy your new found power and lack of oil smell :D

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Whenever I think that I'm out of my mind for putting this much time and money into an old Datsun, all I have to do is look some of your threads to know that I'm not nearly as whack as you are.

You're going to skin a few knuckles, stand up too fast and bump your head, hunt around the floor for the nuts and bolts you dropped, invent a few new cuss words and when you're finished you'll say "That wasn't so hard after all!"


#26 ggzilla

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 05:58 PM

The thing with newer cars vs. the '50s and '60s is you don't seem to get as much ridge on them. I don't think I'm imagining this.

That's Datsun engines, not engines in general. You may not need the ridge reamer with a Datsun engine. On the other hand if there is enough ridge, its easy to break the rings when installing the piston... don't force it.


How are you going to clean the block after the honing? It should be washed with soap and water, and wiped with a paper towel, then repeated until the towel doesn't get dirty from the wipe. Tide powder detergent used to be recommended.

You will also need to wash all the honing grit off the crankshaft and bearings. To do this in the car, you may need to (after washing the cylinders thoroughly) remove each bearing and wash each thoroughly. The grit undoubtedly will get down the side of the bearings.
Here today gone tomorrow

#27 datzenmike

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 08:47 PM

Now one question.....what is the rules for breaking in the new rings and bearings?? You know, the do's and dont's. Thanks again!


Here is a great article on breaking in motors. This applies to ALL engines. 'Back in the day' this would kill a motor fast, but motors are different now. Your dad will say drive it easy for the first 500 miles. Wrong! Warm it up, make sure it is full of oil and tuned ready to go and LEAN ON IT!!!. Not 8,000 RPM shifts or anything. Just make that L WORK hard.

Anyway, read the article a couple of times.
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#28 moparvwfreak

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 09:23 PM

Here is a great article on breaking in motors. This applies to ALL engines. 'Back in the day' this would kill a motor fast, but motors are different now. Your dad will say drive it easy for the first 500 miles. Wrong! Warm it up, make sure it is full of oil and tuned ready to go and LEAN ON IT!!!. Not 8,000 RPM shifts or anything. Just make that L WORK hard.

Anyway, read the article a couple of times.



i think ya forgot the link mike :D
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#29 Phlebmaster

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Posted 13 August 2008 - 08:29 AM

I did not pull the motor, So the tools I used were:

4" cylinder honing tool
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Sockets: 3/8"= 19mm, 17mm, 14mm, 12mm, 10mm, 10mm allen socket for the head bolts, swivel socket, 3" extension & 5" extension, spark plug socket.

Torque wrench 3/8" (long handle click stop)
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Standard 3/8" ratchet (you all have seen these)

Piston ring compressor 4"-7"
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Pully puller (for the main pully)
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Tie rod separator (for removing the steering tie rod)
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Piston ring plyers (I never figured out how to use this one) :lol:
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Screwdrivers, flat and phillips 4" & 6"

Scraper for getting the old gaskets off.

Plastigage
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Feeler guage for measuring end gap and ring clearance.

Micrometer for measuring tolerances.

I think that was it....I may have used a couple of other common tools.

I also purchased a engine gasket kit with everything. It was better than not having what I needed.

I used the Permatex spray copper gasket stuff as well as the ultra copper and ultra black gasket makers.

Piston rings and rod bearings.
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I purchased standard size rings and bearings. But that was because I measured the cylinder walls, pistons, and crankshaft journals for tolerance.

Lucas oil stabilizer and assembly lube.

Quakerstate with slick 50.

New oil filter and fuel filter.

Get a compression tester to check compression before you start and after you complete the rebuild to make sure everything is good.

I did most of my shopping for parts on Rockauto and tools I got from Harbor Freight Tools. The total cost for me was around $225.00 for everything...including the beer. lol

I had her finished in 10 hours including breaks. I hope this helps someone else.
Thanks, Aaron
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#30 cg78

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Posted 13 August 2008 - 10:21 AM

Here is a great article on breaking in motors. This applies to ALL engines. 'Back in the day' this would kill a motor fast, but motors are different now. Your dad will say drive it easy for the first 500 miles. Wrong! Warm it up, make sure it is full of oil and tuned ready to go and LEAN ON IT!!!. Not 8,000 RPM shifts or anything. Just make that L WORK hard.

Anyway, read the article a couple of times.



Exactly. My builder told me to "drive it" change the oil every 100 for the first 500 then again at 1000 and it is done. I never babied it, yet I did not try to tear it up either. Btw I too have replaced a piston while it was in the truck.

#31 datzenmike

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Posted 13 August 2008 - 12:32 PM

Here is a great article on breaking in motors. This applies to ALL engines. 'Back in the day' this would kill a motor fast, but motors are different now. Your dad will say drive it easy for the first 500 miles. Wrong! Warm it up, make sure it is full of oil and tuned ready to go and LEAN ON IT!!!. Not 8,000 RPM shifts or anything. Just make that L WORK hard.

Anyway, read the article a couple of times.


http://www.mototuneu..._in_secrets.htm
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#32 Phlebmaster

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Posted 13 August 2008 - 12:35 PM

Thanks for posting that link Mike! :D
Thanks, Aaron
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#33 HRH

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Posted 13 August 2008 - 08:29 PM

Personally, I use Hasting rings, as they tend to be the right hardness for Datsun blocks. Drive easy for 50-70 miles, preferably a 30 minute sustained trip to break in the engine, with plenty of gear changes. Nothing past about 3500 rpm though. After that, romp it.

As far as the piston hone, I don't use those, it's too easy to take off a lot of material. I use a bottle brush. (Big pipe cleaner like thing with abrasive balls all over.) Little more expensive ($60), but well worth it I think.

#34 datzenmike

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Posted 14 August 2008 - 06:53 AM

Yes, bottle brush type.
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#35 ]2eDeYe

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Posted 14 August 2008 - 07:25 AM

Nice tech thread Phlebmaster :D

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Member- *Japanese Trucking Association*

**DATSUN FAQ** ~ If ya know it, post it ~ If ya don't know it, learn it ~

ratsun.net rising sun stickers                     ratsun business cards order thread

620 KA24 Motor Mount Swap Brackets

1977 620 KingCab Deluxe KA24DE Swap - Refresh and cleanup
1978 620 kingcab 4x4 - KA24E SAS w/Dana 44 front and Toyota rear

1967 RL411 Station Wagon

 

Whenever I think that I'm out of my mind for putting this much time and money into an old Datsun, all I have to do is look some of your threads to know that I'm not nearly as whack as you are.

You're going to skin a few knuckles, stand up too fast and bump your head, hunt around the floor for the nuts and bolts you dropped, invent a few new cuss words and when you're finished you'll say "That wasn't so hard after all!"


#36 Phlebmaster

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Posted 14 August 2008 - 08:28 AM

Nice tech thread Phlebmaster :D


Thanks...if it weren't for threads like these I would not have been able to do this to my motor. :D
Thanks, Aaron
Life is about making dreams come true, stop dreaming and make life happen. ;)
MY_YOUTUBE_VIDEOS :D
To keep an opened mind- speculation is devine.
Assumptions always lead to a dead end!

#37 ezcruiser

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 07:40 PM

Couple questions..

Would it be beneficial to use a stone hone and then a dingleberry/flex hone?

What did you use for lubricating/cutting oil?

What did you end up doing to clean out the shavings and other "trash"?

Going to do mine soon!
I've done so much with so little, I'm now qualified to do anything with nothing!!!

#38 Phlebmaster

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 10:24 PM

Couple questions..

Would it be beneficial to use a stone hone and then a dingleberry/flex hone?

What did you use for lubricating/cutting oil?

What did you end up doing to clean out the shavings and other "trash"?

Going to do mine soon!


I would have used the "dingleberry" one if I had one. I used the stone hone.

I soaked the stones in brake fluid first, then repeatedly applied WD-40 to cylinder walls and stones.

I covered the crankshaft with a plastic surgical drape before I started, then cleaned cylinder walls with detergent and hot water after honing.

I hope this helps...and good luck! Be sure to take pics and post them. :D
Thanks, Aaron
Life is about making dreams come true, stop dreaming and make life happen. ;)
MY_YOUTUBE_VIDEOS :D
To keep an opened mind- speculation is devine.
Assumptions always lead to a dead end!

#39 datzenmike

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 07:22 AM

I've used the cylinder hone in the past too. When done I wiped out the bore with mineral oil on a clean cloth. When you can wipe the bore with a clean white cloth, and it comes out without smudges on it... you're good.
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#40 Phlebmaster

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 09:54 AM

I made a video after I rebuilt the head and it smoked View My Video

...so here is after the piston rings and bearings.


Thanks, Aaron
Life is about making dreams come true, stop dreaming and make life happen. ;)
MY_YOUTUBE_VIDEOS :D
To keep an opened mind- speculation is devine.
Assumptions always lead to a dead end!